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“Powerful and complex”, organized crime is costing Australia every year near 14 billion U.S. dollars.

 

In a statement made in Canberra last Tuesday , the Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said that “organized crime OC is costing Australia almost 13.86 billion U.S. dollars a year and is more  powerful and complex than ever before”.The report is called “Organized Crime in Australia 2013″, and is an unclassified version of the Organized Crime Threat Assessment made by the Australian Crime Commission (ACC). The report provides the context in which OC in Australia operates.

The Report also gives an overview of each of the key illicit markets in Australia, and a description of the activities that fundamentally enable organized crime.

According to the ACC, technology has increased the reach of organized crime. The  Report says that ” Internet enables the establishment of virtual marketplaces for illegal and illicit goods such as drugs, firearms, identification documents and child exploitation material.”

Minister Clare also said organized crime worldwide makes more than  803.8 billion U.S. dollars every year. “If organized crime was a country it would be in the G20,” he said.

The report concludes that to effectively target organized crime, law enforcement agencies need to work together.

According to the report, last year the ACC and the Australian Federal Police met with law enforcement agencies from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand and compared their top 20 criminal target lists.

About Organized Crime.-

Organised crime contributes to much of the nation’s serious crime. The organised crime groups that pose the most significant risk to Australia:

  • are transnational
  • have proven capabilities and involvement in serious crime
  • operate in two or more regions or states
  • operate in multiple crime markets
  • are engaged in the illicit drugs market, fraud and money laundering
  • intermingle legitimate and criminal enterprises
  • are fluid and adaptable
  • are able to employ a range of strategies to further their activities including violence and corruption
  • withstand disruption
  • use new technologies
  • use specialist advice and professional facilitators.